Category Archives: Media

Have you considered sleep with that? How global warming may stop us getting a good night’s sleep

Insomnia and Heat

When we think about increasing global temperatures we tend to think melting ice caps, flooding, and conspiracy theorists who believe scientists (or the Chinese) make this stuff up to exert some unknown power and influence. However, the temperature at night has a direct influence on the quality of our sleep too. So, I’m back to talking about sleep again (the sigh of relief from my adoring crowd is audible – thank you). A recent paper, published in Science, has shown that global warming will not just have an effect on political alliances but also on our sleep. Trump, take note.

The premise of the recent paper, by Dr Nick Obradovich and colleagues, is a simple but profound one. As the summer months trundle on by (and yes, we get some occasional sunshine here in the UK too) you are probably acutely aware of the nightly sojourn to bed and futile attempts at sleep in the oppressive heat. Unless you have the advantage of a trusty fan or even a hint of a breeze outside you know you are going to toss, turn, and throw the covers around until you eventually nod off for a few fragmented hours. Temperature has an evident ability on our ability to get to sleep. This is shown clearly when we consider the changes in body temperature throughout a typical night. As we drift off our body temperature reduces and remains lowered during the sleep period until we wake up. At this point, it starts to rise again helping to improve alertness during the day. This pattern, or circadian rhythm, is no accident – it helps to send us off to sleep. This rise and fall is important and if we increase our temperature too much (e.g. lying in a particularly stuffy room) then we delay the time at which we drop off and are more likely to wake up during the night.

It is this quirk that a research group explored in relation to global warming. In light of what we know, will the increase in global temperature negatively influence our sleep? We can assess this by looking at unseasonably hot days during a month and correlate this with the reported number of nights of poor sleep in the population. This is exactly what Obradovich and colleagues did. They assessed the temperature changes from the average in a number of cities across the US and identified the sleep habits of hundreds of thousands of respondents to a large survey assessing health and disease. They controlled for potential confounders and found that as the temperature increased from the average, for any given month, that there was an increase in reports of nights with disturbed sleep. In fact, as the temperature rises then so does the number of disturbed nights of sleep. When the group compared low and high earners and young and old populations they found that those who were poorer and older tended to suffer more from the effects of temperatures spikes. Finally, as would be expected, they found that these effects were only significant when they looked at the summer months.

This highlighted largely what we already know: that temperature negatively impacts on sleep quality by interfering with the normal process of drifting to sleep. However, the interesting point comes from the next finding of their study. They identified the predicted increases in global temperature until the end of the century from NASA. They then plugged in these values from the first part of the study to identify the effect of increasing temperatures of the number of nights sleep loss until the end of the century. Somewhat worryingly, they found that over the next century the number of nights poor sleep increases in line with the increases in temperature in part due to global warming and climate change. This has implication for physical and mental health which has consistently been tied to the quality and duration of our sleep.

It is important to note that there are plenty of caveats to this study. For example, its indirect and correlational measure of sleep and temperature should raise some concerns about the validity of the findings. Furthermore, it’s important to note that sleep was assessed with a single self-report question, “During the past 30 days, for about how many days have you felt you did not get enough rest or sleep?”. As the authors suggest, further experimental data is needed to back up their claims.  However, the findings from this study do fall in line with what we already know about the effect of temperature on sleep. It is not a stretch to claim that global warming, ignoring other external factors, will have a negative impact on our sleep. There are of course ways to mitigate the negative effects of increasing global temperature but this study also accounted for that. The poorest and oldest stand to suffer most as they cannot afford to keep air conditioning running all night. Therefore, although this is one admittedly large-scale study there is still additional research which needs to further understand the true impact our warming climate will have on our sleep and subsequent health. For the time being, it raises an important reminder that the effects of global warming are far reaching and ignoring the clear evidence for its existent is nothing short of irresponsible and short-sighted. Again, take note Mr. President.

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References:

Obradovich, N., Migliorini, R., Mednick, S. C., & Fowler, J. H. (2017). Nighttime temperature and human sleep loss in a changing climate. Science Advances, 3(5), e1601555.

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What Have Fairy Tales Got to Do With Sleep Medicine?

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“Fairy tales? That’s the best you could think of to drag people in?”

“What’s wrong with it? It’s accurate…”

“I dunno man, you used to be all about the science. Now this feels all click-bait territory *shudders*”

“…”

By fairy tales, I am of course referring to sleeping beauty. Not a champion of feminist thought, this story tells the tale of a young woman who awaits the kiss of a prince to awaken her from an eternal slumber. Although there is no disorder which makes you sleep indefinitely there is a close contender with something called Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) – also known as ‘sleeping beauty’ syndrome.

What is Kleine-Levin syndrome?

Kleine-Levin syndrome is an episodic and extremely rare sleep disorder whereby the individual goes through periods of excessive sleepiness (hypersomnia). We all go through periods of feeling exhausted and may find ourselves sleeping for that bit longer. Maybe in extreme cases we’ve found that we’ve spent the whole day in bed fast asleep (thanks new year’s). However, imagine spending up to 20 hours a day asleep for weeks, or even months with no indication when you’ll ‘wake up’ and go back to normal. You miss school, friends, hobbies, and significant portions of your life as your teenage years drifts steadily away. Your dreams seem more real than reality and you lose interest in everything around you. This is a taste of what those with KLS experience and have to deal with.

Other than spending most of the day asleep, sufferers also experience memory, speech, and comprehension problems. In addition, hallucinations, derealisation (feeling as if in a dream), hypersexuality and megaphagia (increased eating behaviour) and paranoia also co-occur with the sleep and cognitive symptoms. It usually tends to emerge around adolescence and usually runs its course over about 8 years (with individual variability). Unsurprisingly, KLS causes significant disruption to academic performance, social lives, and sometimes memory of affected individuals.

What is its prevalence?

It is such a rare disorder that it has been difficult to get an accurate representation of its prevalence. We do know is that it is more prevalent in males but it seems to persist for longer in females for yet unknown reason. Some studies claim the prevalence is as low as 1 in a million but there is little research to support this number. Due to its rarity, most of our available knowledge on this study has been gained through case studies.

What causes this disorder?

This is uncertain although there is research attempting to shed light on this enigmatic illness. A systematic review carried out just over a decade ago found that in over 40% of reported cases, the first episode of KL-syndrome was preceded by an infection or fever. However, in 39% of cases there was no obvious precipitating trigger and the same lack of trigger is found in 84% of subsequent episodes of KL-syndrome. Although onset tends to occur during the latter months of the year, there is no strong argument for why this might be the case. Moreover, the disease may appear to disappear with little understanding why the symptoms disappear.

The link between infections and KLS has led some to argue that it may have an immune-system cause. However, there is little evidence for a link between dysfunctional immune functioning and KLS. Researchers have found some support for a link between certain types of hypersomnia and autoimmunity disorders but it is still unclear whether this extends to KLS.

A study by Dr. Jing Wang and colleagues at the Binzhou Medical University Hospital examined a large group of individuals with KLS (N=44) to identify potential markers of KLS. They found that a large subset of these individuals (N=34) were found to have reductions in a chemical called orexin in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during a relapse compared to a period of remission. Orexin is a neurochemical which is important for wakefulness and is reduced in another disorder characterised by hypersomnia – narcolepsy. However, levels of orexin were not as low as those seen in narcolepsy. Interestingly, this cohort also showed a similar pattern of viral infection preceding the initial episode of hypersomnia / KLS.

Treatment

Again, it should come with little surprise that there are limited treatment options for those with KLS. One route is to reduce the fatigue through stimulants. However, this approach is not effective for other symptoms of the disorder. A different approach is to treat KLS using a mood stabiliser, lithium, which has shown some promise in reducing the length and frequency of episodes, and in reducing the behavioural symptoms. However, evidence for the efficacy of this treatment is limited and it forms one of many possible pharmacological treatments which require wider study.

Difficulties in Diagnosis

This is an extremely rare disorder and not many will have had experience with this diagnosis. However, it is treated with scepticism from some physicians and the general public. Some see it as laziness or not unusual for adolescents and students to sleep for most of the day. It is also not unusual for an individual with KLS to be given a diagnosis of depression in light of similar symptoms to an unknowing physician. A diagnosis of KLS can be laborious to reach as it will be given after identifying whether the individual’s symptoms are not better explained by a whole host of other diagnoses or causes. We have known about this disorder for more than a century and yet we have no convincing theory for why it occurs or how to treat it.

Although there is a lot we don’t know about KLS there is still active research determined to better understand and treat this disorder. If you’re interested in learning more about what it’s like to live with this illness this documentary is a good start.

Inquisitive Tortoise

References:

Arnulf, I., Zeitzer, J. M., File, J., Farber, N., & Mignot, E. (2005). Kleine–Levin syndrome: a systematic review of 186 cases in the literature. Brain,128(12), 2763-2776.

Barateau, L., Lopez, R., Arnulf, I., Lecendreux, M., Franco, P., Drouot, X., … & Dauvilliers, Y. (2017). Comorbidity between central disorders of hypersomnolence and immune-based disorders. Neurology, 88(1), 93-100.

Kornum, B. R., Rico, T., Lin, L., Huang, Y. S., Arnulf, I., Jennum, P., & Mignot, E. (2015). Serum cytokine levels in Kleine–Levin syndrome. Sleep medicine, 16(8), 961-965.

Leu-Semenescu, S., Le Corvec, T., Groos, E., Lavault, S., Golmard, J. L., & Arnulf, I. (2015). Lithium therapy in Kleine-Levin syndrome An open-label, controlled study in 130 patients. Neurology, 85(19), 1655-1662.

Poppe, M., Friebel, D., Reuner, U., Todt, H., Koch, R., & Heubner, G. (2003). The Kleine-Levin Syndrome. Neuropediatrics, 34(03), 113-119.

Wang, J. Y., Han, F., Dong, S. X., Li, J., An, P., Zhang, X. Z., … & Yan, H. (2016). Cerebrospinal Fluid Orexin A Levels and Autonomic Function in Kleine-Levin Syndrome. Sleep, 39(4), 855.

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Can a Lack of Sleep Kill You?

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“Have you forgotten so easily?” the subject asked. “We are you. We are the madness that lurks within you all, begging to be free at every moment in your deepest animal mind. We are what you hide from in your beds every night. We are what you sedate into silence and paralysis when you go to the nocturnal haven where we cannot tread.”

Surviving participant from ‘The Russian Sleep Experiment’ in the late 1940s. This volunteer went 15 days without sleep.

Before you start looking over your shoulder for the demonic presence presented above, don’t be alarmed. The quote above is from a piece of horror fiction from a website called Creepy Pasta and is completely fake. I hope.

I wanted to start with this as Halloween is fast approaching and I thought that a more fiendish sleep myth was worth looking at. Can a lack of sleep be directly responsible for your death?

A complete lack of sleep is something new parents and those of us with upcoming deadlines may know all too well. It’s draining, depressing, and leaves us eyeing up any available floor space as prime real-estate for your exhausted brain and body.

We have already looked at the effects of getting too little or too much sleep in my earlier post, but not the more extreme side of this. Research conducted with animals at the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th century suggests that not only is sleep important, but that it is vital for sustaining life. In experiments which looked at puppies, cats and rats, it was found that after anything from a few days to around a month of no to very little sleep would lead to death in these animals. This should be taken with a pinch of salt as animals tend to have to be forced to stay awake, and this is typically through stressful contraptions.

How about humans though? What is the longest any one has gone without sleep and gone on to tell the tale?

Well there are two main sources which we can look at. Firstly, there are the people who have willingly deprived themselves of sleep and secondly we can look at people who no longer sleep. Starting with those strange souls who willingly deprive themselves of shut-eye we can look towards a reality TV-show, our trusty sleep-deprived student population, and a couple of radio DJs to start to answer this question.

People are seemingly keen to show off their endurance when it comes to neglecting or overindulging in the necessities of life. Some will do it to win a fabulous prize and others because… Well I’m sure they know why they do it. Anyway, one such contest is relevant here.

The reality TV show ‘Shattered’ provided contestants a chance to win £100,000. All they had to do was be the last one standing in a competition to stay awake the longest. The show was screened on channel 4 in 2004 and its questionable premise didn’t put off a group of eager participants keen to deprive themselves of sleep for fame and glory. The winner stayed awake ultimately for 178 hours. The show capped the length of time participants could remain awake for, and a number of increasingly soporific tasks eventually weeded out one overall victor. If you are interested in this ‘experiment’ you can watch it here.

However, 178 hours was meagre compared to the next contenders. It seems that at the end of the 1950s and early 1960s there was a surge in radio DJs attempting to promote themselves and further their careers in bizarre ways. Collectively they felt that staying awake and parading their increasingly fatigued selves in a department store window was the way to do this.

Our first member of the media to tackle a lack of sleep was a young radio announcer referred to as W.A. He managed to stay awake for a total of 220 hours or just over 9 days. Previously, another radio DJ by the name of Peter Tripp had managed to last 201 hours without sleep. Finally, our last radio DJ, Tom Rounds, shortly after moving to Honolulu in 1959, managed to stay awake for 260 hours and appeared to suffer no long-term effects of his sleep deprivation.

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Is sleep necessary for sustaining life?

However, their collective records did not last long. The radio DJs were swiftly beaten in 1964 by the efforts of a student called Randy Gardener. Randy was a 17 years old student who felt that he could provide something more interesting than a papier-mâché volcano to present at his school’s science fair. He went without sleep for 264.4 hours, which equates to about 11 days and 24 minutes, and supposedly suffered no long-term problems. The often cited report claims that Randy suffered no ill effects of his experiment, yet others claim he experienced hallucinations, paranoia, fluctuations in mood, and problems in short term memory and concentration. The latter would fit with what we know about acute sleep disturbances (Petrovsky et al. 2014; Kahn-Greene et al., 2007).

Interesting, there have been reports of others having seemingly beaten Randy’s record and by a sizeable margin. These have not been validated in part due to scientists and those responsible for recording ‘world records’ not wanting to encourage these record attempts. For example, the Guinness Book of World Records no longer prints updates to the sleep deprivation record since Randy Gardener.

Okay, so far it looks like we can go a long time without sleep and survive. This seems to suggest that although we need sleep (try not sleeping tonight if you’re not convinced), an acute loss is not going to be directly responsible for your demise (but likely indirectly).

Let’s move to the second source of human sleep loss evidence now: those who no longer possess the ability to sleep.

We’ve already looked at people who for one reason or another have decided to willingly deprive themselves of sleep. Yet, for some the ability to sleep is lost. Although insomnia fits this bill, in this case we are referring to the rare genetic brain disease known as Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI). As the name suggests, this disease is associated with a prolonged and severe insomnia which ultimately leads to death. There are some experimental treatments to delay the fatal consequences but these may only provide a couple of extra years at best.

Fatal familial insomnia is a prion disease. Prions are misfolded proteins that cause damage to the brain as they clump together. In the case of FFI, these prions clump at a specific part of the brain known as the thalamus. The thalamus plays a prominent role in regulating sleep and in coordinating the brain as it drifts deeper and deeper in somnolence. As a result, as the damage to the thalamus accumulates this unsurprisingly leads to worsening insomnia.

These individuals seemingly sleep very little or not at all and will survive from a few months to about several years following the presentation of symptoms. The course of this illness would suggest that it is possible to die from sleep deprivation, at least at extreme durations. However, we can’t say that it is the complete lack of sleep alone which kills those with FFI as damage to the thalamus affects other functions rather than just sleep. Moreover, as this disease is so rare that it would be wrong to make a firm conclusion based on this alone. More likely, it seems that the lack of sleep contributes significantly, but not completely, to the decline of those with this illness.

So, what’s the verdict on sleep deprivation being capable of deadly consequences?

The research in animals suggests it can be but the human studies tell another story. Although common myths and horror stories might like to toy with our inbuilt fears about the unknown, it looks like a lack of sleep will not directly lead to your death. Instead, the host of effects already covered may be the true driver between mortality and sleep loss.

Inquisitive Tortoise

References:

Luby, E. D., Frohman, C. E., Grisell, J. L., Lenzo, J. E., & Gottlieb, J. S. (1960). Sleep deprivation: effects on behavior, thinking, motor performance, and biological energy transfer systems. Psychosomatic Medicine, 22(3), 182-192.

Petrovsky, N., Ettinger, U., Hill, A., Frenzel, L., Meyhöfer, I., Wagner, M., … & Kumari, V. (2014). Sleep deprivation disrupts prepulse inhibition and induces psychosis-like symptoms in healthy humans. The Journal of Neuroscience, 34(27), 9134-9140.

** http://creepypasta.wikia.com/wiki/The_Russian_Sleep_Experiment

**In case you find yourself wanting to read the rest of the fictitious foray into the effects of sleep deprivation.

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Sleep Roundup 12/07/16

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So, being the geek that I am I come across lots of interesting sleep talks online and resources which help me with my day to day research. Here’s a roundup of the current sleep talks / podcasts online over this past week or so which grabbed my attention.

This may become a regular thing if I find enough interesting sleep research / talks (organisation permitting, no doubt).

For now enjoy two the latest episode of the Infinite Monkey Cage which is focused on sleep in general and How Much Sleep Do We Need from the BBC. Also, if you don’t already listen to the infinite monkey cage, do so now!

Inquisitive Tortoise

 

 

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How Much Sleep Do We Need?

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Despite our urge to squeeze everything out of the day, sleep is something we cannot live without.

As I start to think about this question, I can feel the inner scientist in me asking a range of questions in response to your first. Sadly, I have a limit to how long my response should be before people start turning off… So, to prevent his becoming a short thesis in itself (or several), I have opted to approach this question in terms of a healthy adult and to focus on how much sleep we need to remain physically and mentally healthy, and not just simply survive.

It is important to ask how much sleep we really need, and just as important to make sure we actually try to achieve this. As we’ll see, sleep is vital for the healthy functioning of many physiological and mental faculties that to skimp on it is inexcusable. As I type this, I can hear many crying out “modern living”, “deadlines”, “fitting everything in”, and even the faint whispers of “YOLO” on the breeze. However, sleep is not simply an inconvenience to our daily lives but an important part of keeping us functioning.

To highlight this, let’s look at the effects of a lack of sleep. A chronic lack of sleep has been shown to be associated with heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and stroke to name but a few. It should also be noted that there’s such a thing as ‘too much’ of a good thing, as excess sleep is associated with similar problems as too little sleep (Shen et al., 2016). At some point, you have probably felt the effects of lying in for too long and the scourge of ‘sleep hangovers’.

How do we measure an ‘optimum’?

There are a number of ways we can do this, but first we need to understand what we mean by optimum and why we sleep in the first place. The exact function of sleep is still not fully understood but it is generally agreed that sleep enables us to grow, is vital for memory and keeps us alert and healthy. In fact, prolonged durations without sleep can distort our perception of reality, interfere with our memory in a staggering way and, in very extreme cases, lead to death.

By looking at this in the long-term, we can identify the ‘optimum’ amount of sleep by observing lots and people’s sleep habits and to identify the risks associated with differing hours of sleep. We can also deprive individuals of sleep and see how they function after a couple of hours (or complete) sleep restriction compared to a normal night. For example, if we deprive someone of 1 or 2 hours sleep per night do we see any effect of an individual’s ability to function during the daytime? If the answer is yes, then this would suggest that those extra hours of sleep are important to us in some way.

So, we are now more familiar with why we should attempt to get the right amount of sleep, and how to measure the importance of sleep, but how much do we actually need? The simple answer is that 7-8 hours is generally considered to be ideal for the majority of individuals. A recent study highlighted that 7 hours was optimum for avoiding the negative impacts of too little or too much sleep (Shen et al., 2016). Another comprehensive review highlighted again that between 7-8 hours was optimum when considering all-cause mortality (i.e. your chance of death is reduced if you get between 7-8 hours of sleep a night, when compared to more or less sleep).

What about those who can survive with less than 7 hours?

However, although there is some merit in this claim, it has created the idea that there is a ‘perfect’ amount of sleep, and that this is the same for everyone. This really is not the case and the amount of sleep an individual ultimately needs to feel refreshed and to function varies from person to person. To many sleep scientists this is source of frustration and avid fascination. Take, for example, individuals who only need 5-6 hours of sleep a night to function, and those who claim they can get by with even less.

Why might it be that some people need less sleep than others? The simple answer seems to be that it all lies in our genetics, and certain mutations in our genetic code are linked to a greater resistance to the effects of sleep deprivation. A particular set of gene mutations outlined by Pellegrino and colleagues (2014) was associated with a reduced need for sleep and fewer negative effects associated with reduced sleep (6 hours). They established that a reduced need for sleep, or an increased resistance to sleep loss, is heritable and the genes involved seem to impact the internal clocks we have in every one of cells.

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“Sleep is not simply an inconvenience to our daily lives but an important part of keeping us functioning.”

Yet, there is a problem with these studies, and others which have looked at those resistant to sleep deprivation. Some individuals may be resistant to effects of sleep deprivation on attention and day-to-day functioning, but most of the large sleep studies have focused on the health impacts of sub-par sleep over very long periods of time. These ‘sleep-deprivation resistant’ studies are conducted over the course of a couple of weeks; the long-term impact of sleeping less than 7-8 hours, and being resistant to short term sleep restriction, has not be extensively studied.

Therefore, it is conceivable that individuals can go with less than 7-8 hours’ sleep in the short term, and some may be better than others at getting away with this. However, ‘getting away with it’ may be just the term we want to use here. These individuals may be able to compensate early on but still be prone to the same health issues associated with reduced sleep as the rest of us in the long term.

Effect of Chronotype

I am about to go off a seemingly unrelated tangent but bear with me (it’ll be interesting, promise!) When people think and talk about sleep in terms of what is optimum and healthy, they will often focus on the duration of sleep. Most people will also mention when they drop off and wake up, but a large part of this conversation will be in relation to their willpower and how they “should really go to bed earlier and wake up earlier”. However, when we go to sleep is an important factor to keep in mind as we look at what healthy sleep looks like. Each of us can be classified on the basis of something called a chronotype and this describes at what time we go to sleep and wake up on a typical day. Although people fall along a complete spectrum, and show some variability, there are two main camps which most tend to fall into: early risers and night-owls. As the names suggest, early risers go to bed earlier and wake up earlier than the night-owls who find themselves more productive later in the day and subsequently wake up later. Great, thanks for the information Jack, but why is this important for my further understanding of healthy sleep?

Although sleep duration is important for a healthy mind and body, the time at which our body wants us to sleep and rise will impact on whether we can achieve the right amount of sleep in the first place. Our current schooling and working world favours the early-risers. As a result, night-owls unfortunately have to constrain their normal sleeping patterns during the working week to fit with the demands of a 9-5 society. This is important, as night-owls may catch-up slightly on their sleep schedules during the weekend but this is rarely enough and produces what is known as social jet-lag. This is the mismatch between what our body-clocks are screaming at us during the week when we wake up earlier than we would naturally do so, and the extended sleep we have during the weekend to attempt to rectify this.

The attempt to rectify the sleep-debt during the weekend is not enough, and this is highlighted by the increased prevalence of mental illnesses in those who score as night-owls on chronotype measures. Therefore, when as well the duration of sleep is important when we consider what healthy sleep should look like. Granted, altering the duration of sleep might be simpler to achieve for most of us than being able to get up later, but that does not make ignoring our own sleep rhythms any less important.

So, although I could likely go on for much longer, I should leave it there. The take home message is that 7-8 hours is the ideal duration of sleep required for a healthy existence. We should also be mindful that duration is not the only indicator of healthy sleep, and listening to your own sleep rhythms is important to ensure you get sufficient and good quality sleep.

Afterword

So,  I have to admit that the inspiration for this question came not from me directly. In fact, the question was part of a project which is collecting an increasingly large database of questions about science in general. The project, known as The Science Room, is run by a good friend of mine in Southampton, and it is determined to answer everyone’s science questions (ambitious, I know!) On that note, if you’re interested in asking any science based questions or learning more about the project, you can find the current webpage here: http://thearthousesouthampton.org/the-science-room/

The answer to this particular question is due to appear on a website dedicated to answering all of these questions (amongst many other things!) I shall link that site here when it’s complete.

Inquisitive Tortoise

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BBC’s ‘In the Mind’ Series

Television

I haven’t written anything in a little while but hopefully that should be fixed over the next week (workload depending). Anyway, this brief post is a slight departure from the normal foray in sleep and everything related to it. I wanted to bring people’s attention to the series of mental health documentaries, short films and portrayals of serious mental illnesses been shown on the BBC over this month. You can find a summary of all of the programs which have already been aired, and are yet to be aired here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2016/in-the-mind

The hour long documentaries / films follow people who have suffered from mental illness in some form of another and create a narrative for the viewer to follow. The aim is to educate and through this hopefully reduce the stigma surrounding in general.

It’s great to see that these documentaries have tackled issues which receive less attention in the media such as postpartum psychosis and bipolar disorder. The former is a disorder which I frequently come across in my reading but which I had no real understanding of. Although an hour is hardly enough to really get to grips with how these disease manifest and impact on a wide variety of different peoples’ lives, the documentaries on biplolar disorder and postpartum psychosis do provide us a privileged window into the lives of people, and their loved ones, fighting with mental illness. Admittedly, it is hard to watch certain scenes and it personally brings back familiar experiences from my own family, both as a child and as an adult.

Also, if anyone is interested, Prof. Richard Bentall has given his own opinion on the BBC’s depiction of bipolar disorder as primarily a biological disorder (https://blogs.canterbury.ac.uk/discursive/all-in-the-brain/#.VscA52Zud_U.twitter) He acknowledges the role of drugs in the recovery of very ill individuals but argues that a focus on the biological aspect of mental illness does very little to help with stigma (e.g. it creates a dichotomy of the sick and the healthy). I agree in the sense that the documentaries I have managed to watch so far focus on the severe stages of mental illness and neglect the broad spectrum of mental illness from health to hospitalisation. They give people a glimpse into mental health but perhaps see it as if through a window into the ‘other side’. However, I would also argue that these documentaries give understanding of what it means to be given a diagnosis of a mental illness and how individuals and their families deal with this. In this sense, they help to break down boundaries between stigmatised terms, such as ‘psychosis’, with no human experience to attach to them. It is because of this I would suggest people watch at least one of the documentaries being shown and currently on iPlayer.

Anyway, I just wanted this to be brief and not a matter of me typing lots of stuff into the ether of wordpress. One last thing, I also want to give a link to a really useful link about the role of drawing in talking and dealing with mental health (here http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/35564616/mental-health-week-how-drawings-on-social-media-are-changing-the-conversation?ocid=socialflow_facebook&ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbcnews&ns_source=facebook) Although her work isn’t included here but I personally found the drawings of Allie Brosh particularly helpful and a good explanation of what it is to live with depression (http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/adventures-in-depression.html). Please check some of these out, and share them with people who might find them helpful, educational, or simply interesting.

Inquisitive Tortoise

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