BBC’s ‘In the Mind’ Series

Television

I haven’t written anything in a little while but hopefully that should be fixed over the next week (workload depending). Anyway, this brief post is a slight departure from the normal foray in sleep and everything related to it. I wanted to bring people’s attention to the series of mental health documentaries, short films and portrayals of serious mental illnesses been shown on the BBC over this month. You can find a summary of all of the programs which have already been aired, and are yet to be aired here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2016/in-the-mind

The hour long documentaries / films follow people who have suffered from mental illness in some form of another and create a narrative for the viewer to follow. The aim is to educate and through this hopefully reduce the stigma surrounding in general.

It’s great to see that these documentaries have tackled issues which receive less attention in the media such as postpartum psychosis and bipolar disorder. The former is a disorder which I frequently come across in my reading but which I had no real understanding of. Although an hour is hardly enough to really get to grips with how these disease manifest and impact on a wide variety of different peoples’ lives, the documentaries on biplolar disorder and postpartum psychosis do provide us a privileged window into the lives of people, and their loved ones, fighting with mental illness. Admittedly, it is hard to watch certain scenes and it personally brings back familiar experiences from my own family, both as a child and as an adult.

Also, if anyone is interested, Prof. Richard Bentall has given his own opinion on the BBC’s depiction of bipolar disorder as primarily a biological disorder (https://blogs.canterbury.ac.uk/discursive/all-in-the-brain/#.VscA52Zud_U.twitter) He acknowledges the role of drugs in the recovery of very ill individuals but argues that a focus on the biological aspect of mental illness does very little to help with stigma (e.g. it creates a dichotomy of the sick and the healthy). I agree in the sense that the documentaries I have managed to watch so far focus on the severe stages of mental illness and neglect the broad spectrum of mental illness from health to hospitalisation. They give people a glimpse into mental health but perhaps see it as if through a window into the ‘other side’. However, I would also argue that these documentaries give understanding of what it means to be given a diagnosis of a mental illness and how individuals and their families deal with this. In this sense, they help to break down boundaries between stigmatised terms, such as ‘psychosis’, with no human experience to attach to them. It is because of this I would suggest people watch at least one of the documentaries being shown and currently on iPlayer.

Anyway, I just wanted this to be brief and not a matter of me typing lots of stuff into the ether of wordpress. One last thing, I also want to give a link to a really useful link about the role of drawing in talking and dealing with mental health (here http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/35564616/mental-health-week-how-drawings-on-social-media-are-changing-the-conversation?ocid=socialflow_facebook&ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbcnews&ns_source=facebook) Although her work isn’t included here but I personally found the drawings of Allie Brosh particularly helpful and a good explanation of what it is to live with depression (http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/adventures-in-depression.html). Please check some of these out, and share them with people who might find them helpful, educational, or simply interesting.

Inquisitive Tortoise

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Filed under Media, Psychology, Schizophrenia, Voice Hearing

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