Sleep Snippet: Why Bother Even Trying to Understand Sleep?

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Sleep in its natural environment.

It’s a fair question (although don’t tell my supervisors that I said that…) We enjoy doing it, it refreshes us, and we tend to find ourselves doing it in any spot we find ourselves last thing on a Wednesday afternoon. Most of us could identify that we need sleep and that it helps maintain the brain and body in some way but why do we need to go any further than that, other than for pure curiosity?

Sleep is important for our ability to function in the world about us. As we are likely all aware, a night without sleep or a few days with very little sleep can make it incredibly hard to do much of anything. We find it hard to concentrate on conversations with colleagues or friends, find ourselves becoming more forgetful and start to see every nook and cranny as ideal spots for a quick nap. In addition, we become more irritable and may find it harder in general to control our emotions. If we have been deprived of sleep for long enough, we may even start to see and hear things which are not really there and become increasingly paranoid.

For most of us these experiences are temporary and we can largely shrug off the negative effects of too little sleep by making sure we go back to a regular routine of sufficient sleep. However, what about those who can’t? What about people who struggle to sleep at all and who do not feel rested after a night in bed? It is important to understand a) why these individuals struggle with sleep and b) how poor sleep leads them to experience the negative side-effects we all do but to a much greater degree? The second question, in part, can be understood by trying to explore the effect of a lack of sleep on relatively healthy individuals like you and me.

The importance in understanding why we sleep and how this should look in the brain lies in how we can use that knowledge to help those who can’t sleep or whose sleep is disturbed significantly. This can involve those who suffer from sleep disorders such as insomnia (where we don’t sleep enough), hypersomnia (where we sleep too much), and narcolepsy (where we unexpectedly fall asleep throughout the day) to name a few examples.

We can also look at the role of sleep difficulties in the context of other illnesses, where problems drifting off to sleep and staying so can exacerbate or lead to many different symptoms of disease. For example, sleep difficulties have been implicated in many mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression and anxiety disorders. In fact, around 80% of individuals with schizophrenia will experience some form of sleep disruption. Sleep difficulties have also been shown to have an influence on diseases of the immune system such as ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, and in neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease. I am very conscious of how many different disorders I could list where an understanding of sleep could help to reduce suffering but that might make for a rather boring article (and not help with my self-imposed word limit…) Through understanding sleep, we can understand these related illnesses to a greater extent and hopefully provide better treatments for patients.

Hopefully, in this short snippet of an article has shown that understanding why and how we sleep is important and worthwhile.

Inquisitive Tortoise

Image Credits:

Header Image: Sleep in Society

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Filed under General Interest, PhD, Psychology, Sleep Science

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