Monthly Archives: February 2016

BBC’s ‘In the Mind’ Series

Television

I haven’t written anything in a little while but hopefully that should be fixed over the next week (workload depending). Anyway, this brief post is a slight departure from the normal foray in sleep and everything related to it. I wanted to bring people’s attention to the series of mental health documentaries, short films and portrayals of serious mental illnesses been shown on the BBC over this month. You can find a summary of all of the programs which have already been aired, and are yet to be aired here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2016/in-the-mind

The hour long documentaries / films follow people who have suffered from mental illness in some form of another and create a narrative for the viewer to follow. The aim is to educate and through this hopefully reduce the stigma surrounding in general.

It’s great to see that these documentaries have tackled issues which receive less attention in the media such as postpartum psychosis and bipolar disorder. The former is a disorder which I frequently come across in my reading but which I had no real understanding of. Although an hour is hardly enough to really get to grips with how these disease manifest and impact on a wide variety of different peoples’ lives, the documentaries on biplolar disorder and postpartum psychosis do provide us a privileged window into the lives of people, and their loved ones, fighting with mental illness. Admittedly, it is hard to watch certain scenes and it personally brings back familiar experiences from my own family, both as a child and as an adult.

Also, if anyone is interested, Prof. Richard Bentall has given his own opinion on the BBC’s depiction of bipolar disorder as primarily a biological disorder (https://blogs.canterbury.ac.uk/discursive/all-in-the-brain/#.VscA52Zud_U.twitter) He acknowledges the role of drugs in the recovery of very ill individuals but argues that a focus on the biological aspect of mental illness does very little to help with stigma (e.g. it creates a dichotomy of the sick and the healthy). I agree in the sense that the documentaries I have managed to watch so far focus on the severe stages of mental illness and neglect the broad spectrum of mental illness from health to hospitalisation. They give people a glimpse into mental health but perhaps see it as if through a window into the ‘other side’. However, I would also argue that these documentaries give understanding of what it means to be given a diagnosis of a mental illness and how individuals and their families deal with this. In this sense, they help to break down boundaries between stigmatised terms, such as ‘psychosis’, with no human experience to attach to them. It is because of this I would suggest people watch at least one of the documentaries being shown and currently on iPlayer.

Anyway, I just wanted this to be brief and not a matter of me typing lots of stuff into the ether of wordpress. One last thing, I also want to give a link to a really useful link about the role of drawing in talking and dealing with mental health (here http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/35564616/mental-health-week-how-drawings-on-social-media-are-changing-the-conversation?ocid=socialflow_facebook&ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbcnews&ns_source=facebook) Although her work isn’t included here but I personally found the drawings of Allie Brosh particularly helpful and a good explanation of what it is to live with depression (http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/adventures-in-depression.html). Please check some of these out, and share them with people who might find them helpful, educational, or simply interesting.

Inquisitive Tortoise

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Filed under Media, Psychology, Schizophrenia, Voice Hearing

Sleep Snippet: Why Bother Even Trying to Understand Sleep?

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Sleep in its natural environment.

It’s a fair question (although don’t tell my supervisors that I said that…) We enjoy doing it, it refreshes us, and we tend to find ourselves doing it in any spot we find ourselves last thing on a Wednesday afternoon. Most of us could identify that we need sleep and that it helps maintain the brain and body in some way but why do we need to go any further than that, other than for pure curiosity?

Sleep is important for our ability to function in the world about us. As we are likely all aware, a night without sleep or a few days with very little sleep can make it incredibly hard to do much of anything. We find it hard to concentrate on conversations with colleagues or friends, find ourselves becoming more forgetful and start to see every nook and cranny as ideal spots for a quick nap. In addition, we become more irritable and may find it harder in general to control our emotions. If we have been deprived of sleep for long enough, we may even start to see and hear things which are not really there and become increasingly paranoid.

For most of us these experiences are temporary and we can largely shrug off the negative effects of too little sleep by making sure we go back to a regular routine of sufficient sleep. However, what about those who can’t? What about people who struggle to sleep at all and who do not feel rested after a night in bed? It is important to understand a) why these individuals struggle with sleep and b) how poor sleep leads them to experience the negative side-effects we all do but to a much greater degree? The second question, in part, can be understood by trying to explore the effect of a lack of sleep on relatively healthy individuals like you and me.

The importance in understanding why we sleep and how this should look in the brain lies in how we can use that knowledge to help those who can’t sleep or whose sleep is disturbed significantly. This can involve those who suffer from sleep disorders such as insomnia (where we don’t sleep enough), hypersomnia (where we sleep too much), and narcolepsy (where we unexpectedly fall asleep throughout the day) to name a few examples.

We can also look at the role of sleep difficulties in the context of other illnesses, where problems drifting off to sleep and staying so can exacerbate or lead to many different symptoms of disease. For example, sleep difficulties have been implicated in many mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression and anxiety disorders. In fact, around 80% of individuals with schizophrenia will experience some form of sleep disruption. Sleep difficulties have also been shown to have an influence on diseases of the immune system such as ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, and in neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease. I am very conscious of how many different disorders I could list where an understanding of sleep could help to reduce suffering but that might make for a rather boring article (and not help with my self-imposed word limit…) Through understanding sleep, we can understand these related illnesses to a greater extent and hopefully provide better treatments for patients.

Hopefully, in this short snippet of an article has shown that understanding why and how we sleep is important and worthwhile.

Inquisitive Tortoise

Image Credits:

Header Image: Sleep in Society

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Filed under General Interest, PhD, Psychology, Sleep Science